Trails Benefits Library

This Trails Benefits Library is a collection of studies on the positive impacts of trails on businesses, public health, and quality of life. Use this form to search by type of benefit, use, year, and region.

Find trails studies by:

Benefit

Use

Year

Region

Studies found (5) for Vermont:

Economic Impact of Bicycling and Walking in Vermont

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Benefits studied:
Uses studied: ,
Overview: This study found that cycling and pedestrian activities in Vermont generate substantial state-wide economic impact through the construction and maintenance of trails, businesses serving cyclists and pedestrians, and events.  Although not quantified in this study, trails also provide benefits to residents through avoided transportation costs for consumers (e.g., gasoline and vehicle maintenance), avoided transportation costs for the public (e.g., reduced maintenance costs due to fewer vehicle trips), and increases in real estate values near trails.
Region:
States:
Place: Statewide
Citation: Resource Systems Group, Inc.., Economic and Policy Resources, Inc., and Local Motion. 2012. Economic Impact of Bicycling and Walking in Vermont. Prepared for the Vermont Agency of Transportation.

Potential Economic Impact of Outdoor Recreation in the Barre Town Forest, Vermont

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Benefits studied:
Overview: This study found that expanding an existing trail system with broad regional draw in Barre, Vermont could significantly increase visitor use and spending. Using a range of projected growth rates, the authors predict that the local economy could see relatively small but meaningful gains in new spending and employment.
Region:
States:
Place: Barre
Citation: Posner, S. and M. Ceroni. 2011. Potential Economic Impact of Outdoor Recreation in the Barre Town Forest, Vermont. Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, University of Vermont. Funded by The Trust for Public Land.

Estimating Tourism Expenditures for the Burlington Waterfront Path and the Island Line Trail

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Uses studied: ,
Overview: In Burlington, Vermont, a lakefront trail is visited mostly by locals, who use it for both recreation and transportation. Closest to downtown Burlington, non-locals use the trail as much as locals and non-local day trips account for the greatest spending in the community.
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States:
Place: Burlington
Citation: Zhang, C., L. Jennings, and L. Aultman-Hall. 2010. Estimating Tourism Expenditures for the Burlington Waterfront Path and the Island Line Trail, Report # 10-003. Burlington, VT: University of Vermont Transportation Research Center.

The Northern Forest Canoe Trail: Economic Impacts and Implications for Sustainable Community Development

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Uses studied:
Overview: Across New York, Vermont, Quebec, New Hampshire, and Maine, the 740-mile Northern Forest Canoe Trail (NFCT) draws 90,000 users annually. Although most users visit areas with other attractions and established tourist infrastructure like hotels and restaurants, the smaller number of visitors to remote parts of the trail bring valuable outside spending.
Place: Northern New England and Quebec
Citation: Pollock, N., L. Chase, C. Ginger, and J. Kolodinsky. 2007. The Northern Forest Canoe Trail: Economic Impacts and Implications for Sustainable Community Development. Burlington, VT: University of Vermont Tourism Data Center.

Bicycle Tourism in Maine: Economic Impacts and Marketing Recommendations

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Uses studied:
Overview: This study found that bicycling tourism in Maine is associated with modest spending, largely because nearly all bicycle tourists in the state are day users. Developing long-distance rail-trails and multi-day self-guided tour routes could help increase the number of cycling tourists and increase the economic impact from cycling, particularly in rural communities.
Region:
States:
Place: Statewide
Citation: Wilbur Smith Associates. 2001. Bicycle Tourism in Maine: Economic Impacts and Marketing Recommendations. Maine Department of Transportation Office of Passenger Transportation.