Trails Benefits Library

This Trails Benefits Library is a collection of studies on the positive impacts of trails on businesses, public health, and quality of life. Use this form to search by type of benefit, use, year, and region.

Find trails studies by:

Benefit

Use

Year

Region

Studies found (8) for 2015:

Happy Trails: The Effect of a Media Campaign on Urban Trail Use in Southern Nevada

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Benefits studied:
Uses studied:
Overview: A media campaign to promote a trails information site in Las Vegas, Nevada appears to have significantly increased trail use across most trails studied. The size of the gain in trail use appears to be independent of trail lighting, landscaping, and trail length.
Region:
States:
Place: Las Vegas
Citation: Clark, S., T. J. Bungum, M. Meacham, and L. Coker. 2015. "Happy trails: the effect of a media campaign on urban trail use in southern Nevada." Journal of Physical Activity and Health 12(1): 48-51.

Jackson Hole Pathways and Trails Survey

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Benefits studied:
Overview: In Jackson Hole, Wyoming, a random, statistically representative survey gathered information about residents’ opinions of pathways and trails, including levels and types of use, satisfaction, strengths and weaknesses, and the role the trail system plays in quality of life. The survey found that 91 percent of residents had used the trail system in the previous 12 months and the trail system functions well for recreation, but could use improvements to serve transportation needs.
Region:
States:
Place: Teton County
Citation: RRC Associates. 2015. Jackson Hole Pathways and Trails Survey. Prepared for Teton County, WY; Friends of Pathways; Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce; Town of Jackson, WY; Headwaters Economics. Boulder, CO: RRC Associates.

Oregon Non-Motorized Trail Participation and Priorities

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Overview: Non-motorized trail users in Oregon account for 162.3 million user days per year, and the vast majority of these days are spent walking or hiking. While these recreation days are associated with substantial expenditures, the amount spent per person per day and the total economic impact vary greatly within the state.
Region:
States:
Place: State-wide
Citation: Lindberg, K. and T. Bertone-Riggs. 2015. Oregon Non-Motorized Trail Participation and Priorities. Prepared for the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. Corvallis, OR: Oregon State University.

Oregon Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Participation and Priorities

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Uses studied:
Overview: Across Oregon, off-highway vehicle (OHV) riders account for approximately 3.1 million days of riding per year and nearly $100 million in spending.  Sixty percent of respondents support increasing the OHV registration fee from $10 to $15, and more than half identify the maintenance of existing trails as the most important funding priority.
Region:
States:
Place: State-wide
Citation: Lindberg, K. and T. Bertone-Riggs. 2015. Oregon Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) Participation and Priorities. Salem, OR: Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

Oregon Snowmobiler Participation and Priorities

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Uses studied:
Overview: Across Oregon, snowmobilers account for approximately 353,000 user days per year and $15 million in spending associated with snowmobile trips. Respondents are most concerned about the availability of backcountry, off-trail riding opportunities and sustaining access to existing riding areas.
Region:
States:
Place: State-wide
Citation: Lindberg, K. and T. Bertone-Riggs. 2015. Oregon Snowmobiler Participation and Priorities. Salem, OR: Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

Outdoor Recreation Scarcity and Abundance in Western Oregon: A Spatial Analysis

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Benefits studied:
Overview: Across western Oregon, there is substantial variation in how well the supply of hiking, mountain biking, and off-highway vehicle (OHV) trails meets demand for these trails by local users. Although some communities have many miles of trails, such as the 146 miles of mountain biking trails within 60 minutes of Portland, the supply of trails may be too low to support the number of people using them.
Region:
States:
Place: Portland, Tillamook, Sandy, Newburg, McMinnville, Salem, Corvallis, Eugene, Coos Bay, Roseburg, Grants Pass, Medford
Citation: ECONorthwest. 2015. Outdoor recreation scarcity and abundance in Western Oregon: A Spatial Analysis. Portland, OR: Bureau of Land Management.

The Impacts of Central Ohio Trails

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Uses studied: ,
Overview: This thorough study of a 111-mile regional trail network around Columbus, Ohio found that trail users travelled roughly 11.9 million miles in 2014, mostly by bicycle. Higher population density, easy access from neighborhoods, connection to other trails, and longer trails are associated with greater use.
Region:
States:
Place: Columbus metro area
Citation: Lindsey, G., T. Nordstrom, X. Wu, C. Wu, J. Ciabotti, B. B. Woods, R. J. Eldridge, et al. 2015. The Impacts of Central Ohio Trails. Prepared for the Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission and the Central Ohio Greenways and Trails Group. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Humphrey School of Public Affairs.

Yellowstone-Grand Teton Loop Bicycle Pathway Estimated Economic Impact

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Uses studied:
Overview: A 262-mile cycle touring loop connecting Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks, with significant portions on non-motorized pathways, has the potential to generate important economic activity in the small communities through which it would pass. However, due to the challenges of estimating economic impact across a large area and areas close to national parks, the use and economic impact estimates are likely overstated.
Region:
Place: Teton and Fremont Counties, Idaho; Teton and Park Counties, Wyoming; and Gallatin County, Montana
Citation: Jenson, W., and K. Scoresby. 2015. Yellowstone-Grand Teton Loop Pathway Bicycle Pathway Estimated Economic Impact. Rexburg, ID: Eastern Idaho Entrepreneurial Center.