Trails Benefits Library

This Trails Benefits Library is a collection of studies on the positive impacts of trails on businesses, public health, and quality of life. Use this form to search by type of benefit, use, year, and region.

Find trails studies by:

Benefit

Use

Year

Region

Studies found (7) for Access:

Recreation Equity: Is the Forest Service Serving Its Diverse Publics?

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Benefits studied:
Uses studied:
Overview: Across the U.S., racial and ethnic minorities visit national forests much less than white counterparts from neighboring counties. This disparity is the most pronounced in areas with the highest share of minorities living nearby, suggesting a significant need for creative outreach efforts.
States:
Place: National Forest units across the U.S.
Citation: Flores, D., Falco, G., Roberts, N.S., and Valenzuela III, F.P. 2018. Recreation Equity: Is the Forest Service Serving Its Diverse Publics? Journal of Forestry 116(3): 266-272.

Enchanted Circle Trails: Final Survey Results

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Benefits studied: , ,
Overview: In Taos, New Mexico, Hispanic residents and low-income residents are less likely to have used trails during the previous year, but those who have used trails during the previous year use them just as often as other (non-Hispanic) residents. Among low-income residents, those with a park or trail within a 10-minute walk of their house were 50 percent more likely to have used trails during the previous year.
Region:
States:
Place: Taos County
Citation: RRC Associates. 2016. Enchanted Circle Trails: Final Survey Results. Prepared for Taos Land Trust; Headwaters Economics. Boulder, CO: RRC Associates.

Neighborhood Income Matters: Disparities in Community Recreation Facilities, Amenities, and Programs

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Benefits studied: ,
Uses studied:
Overview: At a sample of recreation centers in southern California, researchers find that several measures of facility condition and amenities are better in high-income neighborhoods relative to low-income neighborhoods. The likelihood that a child uses the recreation center increases 23 percent for each $10,000 increase in neighborhood income, but the authors do not find a relationship between the quality of the facility and participation rates.
Region:
States:
Place: San Diego County
Citation: McKenzie, T.L., Moody, J.S., Carlson, J.A., Lopez, N.V. and Elder, J.P., 2013. Neighborhood income matters: disparities in community recreation facilities, amenities, and programs. Journal of Park and Recreation Administration 31(4): 12.

Neighborhood Poverty, Park Use, and Park-Based Physical Activity in a Southern California City

→Summary & Interpretation

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Benefits studied: ,
Uses studied:
Overview: A large study of 50 urban parks in Southern California measures park use by nearby residents and other users across high-, medium-, and low-poverty areas, finding that parks are used less in high-poverty areas. Those who do use parks in high-poverty areas, however, on average use the parks more per week, are more likely to see familiar people in the parks, and use the parks more when there are more staff present.
Region:
States:
Place: Large southern California city
Citation: Cohen, D.A., Han, B., Derose, K.P., Williamson, S., Marsh, T., Rudick, J. and McKenzie, T.L., 2012. Neighborhood poverty, park use, and park-based physical activity in a Southern California city. Social Science & Medicine 75(12): 2317-2325.

Childhood Obesity and Proximity to Urban Parks and Recreational Resources: A Longitudinal Cohort Study

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Benefits studied: ,
Uses studied:
Overview: By following a large sample of children over time, this study demonstrates that children who participate in recreation programs, or who live a walkable distance from parks, are much less likely to be obese or overweight. These benefits can be achieved through formal parks and programs, but also through accessible green space or other small, informal places that encourage informal play.
Region:
States:
Place: Los Angeles County
Citation: Wolch, J., Jerrett, M., Reynolds, K., McConnell, R., Chang, R., Dahmann, N., Brady, K., Gilliland, F., Su, J.G. and Berhane, K., 2011. Childhood obesity and proximity to urban parks and recreational resources: a longitudinal cohort study. Health & Place 17(1): 207-214.

Effect of Exposure to Natural Environment on Health Inequalities: An Observational Population Study

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Benefits studied: ,
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Overview: Research has established that low-income people tend to have higher mortality rates than high-income residents. This study across all of England demonstrates that this gap in mortality rate is about half the size in areas with the most green space compared to areas with the least green space.
States:
Place: U.K.-wide
Citation: Mitchell, R. and Popham, F., 2008. Effect of exposure to natural environment on health inequalities: an observational population study. The Lancet 372(9650): 1655-1660.

Parks and Park Funding in Los Angeles: An Equity-Mapping Analysis

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Benefits studied:
Uses studied:
Overview: In Los Angeles, historic land use policies that emphasized low-density housing and did not prioritize public park spaces have led to significant inequities of park access across race, ethnicity, and income. A fund designed to improve access to public parks could exacerbate this problem unless it considers proposals for nontraditional public spaces such as schoolyards and vacant lots, because there is very little available park space in the most underserved neighborhoods.
Region:
States:
Place: City of Los Angeles
Citation: Wolch, J., Wilson, J.P. and Fehrenbach, J., 2005. Parks and park funding in Los Angeles: An equity-mapping analysis. Urban Geography 26(1): 4-35.