Trails Benefits Library

This Trails Benefits Library is a collection of studies on the positive impacts of trails on businesses, public health, and quality of life. Use this form to search by type of benefit, use, year, and region.

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Benefit

Use

Year

Region

Studies found (8) for Other:

Recreation Equity: Is the Forest Service Serving Its Diverse Publics?

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
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Uses studied:
Overview: Across the U.S., racial and ethnic minorities visit national forests much less than white counterparts from neighboring counties. This disparity is the most pronounced in areas with the highest share of minorities living nearby, suggesting a significant need for creative outreach efforts.
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Place: National Forest units across the U.S.
Citation: Flores, D., Falco, G., Roberts, N.S., and Valenzuela III, F.P. 2018. Recreation Equity: Is the Forest Service Serving Its Diverse Publics? Journal of Forestry 116(3): 266-272.

Impact of a Park-Based Afterschool Program Replicated Over Five Years on Modifiable Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors

→Summary & Interpretation

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Uses studied: ,
Overview: A daily afterschool program in Miami-Dade County, Florida observes significant decreases in body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure between the beginning and end of the school year. Findings from this research suggest consistent, long-term afterschool programs can effectively reduce childhood obesity and cardiovascular disease risk.
Region:
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Place: Miami-Dade County
Citation: Messiah, S.E., Vidot, D., Hansen, E., Kardys, J., Matthew, M.S., Nardi, M. and Arheart, K.L., 2017. Impact of a park-based afterschool program replicated over five years on modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors. Preventive Medicine 95: 66-73.

Reducing Childhood Obesity Through Coordinated Care: Development of a Park Prescription Program

→Summary & Interpretation

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Overview: In Miami-Dade County, Florida, researchers evaluated the structure of a pilot project connecting children, families, and their pediatricians to a park-based afterschool program. This study describes important factors encouraging ongoing support from participating families and pediatricians, as well as ways to measure the effectiveness of prescription parks programs.
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States:
Place: Miami-Dade County
Citation: Messiah, S.E., Jiang, S., Kardys, J., Hansen, E., Nardi, M. and Forster, L., 2016. Reducing childhood obesity through coordinated care: Development of a park prescription program. World Journal of Clinical Pediatrics 5(3): 234.

Estimating the Health Economic Benefits of Cycling

→Summary & Interpretation

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Uses studied: ,
Overview: This study found that constructing a cycling-specific route separate from vehicle traffic has the potential to make cycling much safer for commuters in Dublin, Ireland, reducing mortality risk by 18 percent. In monetary terms, the benefits of reduced risk outweigh construction costs by at least two-fold.
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Place: Dublin
Citation: Deenihan, G. and B. Caulfield. 2014. “Estimating the Health Economic Benefits of Cycling.” Journal of Transport & Health 1(2): 141-149.

Park-Based Afterschool Program to Improve Cardiovascular Health and Physical Fitness in Children with Disabilities

→Summary & Interpretation

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Overview: In Miami-Dade County, Florida, an afterschool, park-based program is effective in improving physical fitness among a sample of 52 children with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Afterschool programs may be an effective strategy to increase physical activity among disabled children, who tend to be less physically active than their non-disabled peers.
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Place: Miami-Dade County
Citation: Haney, K., Messiah, S.E., Arheart, K.L., Hanson, E., Diego, A., Kardys, J., Kirwin, K., Nottage, R., Ramirez, S., Somarriba, G. and Binhack, L., 2014. Park-based afterschool program to improve cardiovascular health and physical fitness in children with disabilities. Disability and Health Journal 7(3): 335-342.

Childhood Obesity and Proximity to Urban Parks and Recreational Resources: A Longitudinal Cohort Study

→Summary & Interpretation

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Overview: By following a large sample of children over time, this study demonstrates that children who participate in recreation programs, or who live a walkable distance from parks, are much less likely to be obese or overweight. These benefits can be achieved through formal parks and programs, but also through accessible green space or other small, informal places that encourage informal play.
Region:
States:
Place: Los Angeles County
Citation: Wolch, J., Jerrett, M., Reynolds, K., McConnell, R., Chang, R., Dahmann, N., Brady, K., Gilliland, F., Su, J.G. and Berhane, K., 2011. Childhood obesity and proximity to urban parks and recreational resources: a longitudinal cohort study. Health & Place 17(1): 207-214.

Parks and Park Funding in Los Angeles: An Equity-Mapping Analysis

→Summary & Interpretation

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Overview: In Los Angeles, historic land use policies that emphasized low-density housing and did not prioritize public park spaces have led to significant inequities of park access across race, ethnicity, and income. A fund designed to improve access to public parks could exacerbate this problem unless it considers proposals for nontraditional public spaces such as schoolyards and vacant lots, because there is very little available park space in the most underserved neighborhoods.
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Place: City of Los Angeles
Citation: Wolch, J., Wilson, J.P. and Fehrenbach, J., 2005. Parks and park funding in Los Angeles: An equity-mapping analysis. Urban Geography 26(1): 4-35.

The economic impacts and uses of long-distance trails

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Uses studied: ,
Overview: Although visitor spending per day along the Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail in western Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina, and South Carolina is relatively low, the large number of visitors generates substantial economic impact. However, much of this spending is likely due to the attraction of specific historic sites and not the trail, because relatively few visitors were aware that the historic sites are connected to a larger regional trail.
Region:
Place: North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia
Citation: Moore, R. L., and K. Barthlow. 1998. The economic impacts and uses of long-distance trails. Prepared for U.S. Department of Interior National Park Service. Raleigh, NC: North Carolina State University Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management.