Trails Benefits Library

This Trails Benefits Library is a collection of studies on the positive impacts of trails on businesses, public health, and quality of life. Use this form to search by type of benefit, use, year, and region.

Find trails studies by:

Benefit

Use

Year

Region

Studies found (7) for 2005:

A Cost-Benefit Analysis of Physical Activity Using Bike/Pedestrian Trails

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Benefits studied:
Uses studied: ,
Overview: Trails in Lincoln, Nebraska have the potential to generate large benefits for trail users in terms of avoided medical costs. These benefits may significantly outweigh the per capita cost of trail construction and maintenance. However, due to simplifying assumptions made regarding both benefits and costs, the cost-benefit ratios are unreliable.
Region:
States:
Place: Lincoln
Citation: Wang, G.,  C.A. Macera, B. Scudder-Soucie, T. Schmid, M. Pratt, and D. Buchner. 2005. "A cost-benefit analysis of physical activity using bike/pedestrian trails." Health Promotion Practice 6: 174-179.

Economic Impacts of MVSTA Trails and Land Resources in the Methow Valley

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Uses studied:
Overview: This study found that the 200-kilometer Nordic skiing trail network in the Methow Valley of Washington state is the reason why many people visit the area and choose to purchase homes there. Non-resident trail users and residents alike are largely willing to pay some amount of money to support trail maintenance and additional trail construction.
Region:
States:
Place: Okanogan County
Citation: Resource Dimensions. 2005. Economic Impacts of MVSTA Trails and Land Resources in the Methow Valley. Methow Valley Sport Trails Association.

Evaluating Change in Physical Activity with the Building of a Multi-Use Trail

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Benefits studied:
Uses studied: ,
Overview: This study found that people who used a new rail trail in Durham, North Carolina reported exercising more during the month after it opened, although it did not appear that their minutes spent exercising per week was actually any higher than before the trail opened. Potential effects of new trails on physical activity may take longer to manifest themselves in residents’ habits, and the effects likely depend on how many trails are already nearby.
Region:
Place: Durham
Citation: Evenson, K., A. Herring, and S. Huston. 2005. “Evaluating change in physical activity with the building of a multi-use trail.” American Journal of Preventive Medicine 28(2): 177-185.

Exploring the Market Potential for Yukon Mountain Bike Tourism

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Uses studied:
Overview: This study found that the Yukon Territory in Canada has the potential to become a destination for mountain biking based on its undeveloped landscape, varied terrain that would accommodate a range of abilities, and existing network of old First Nations and prospector trails. The difficulty of reaching the Yukon by car or plane is a substantial obstacle that could be overcome for some visitors by marketing the area’s frontier reputation.
States:
Place: Yukon Territory
Citation: Koepke, J. 2005. Exploring the Market Potential for Yukon Mountain Bike Tourism. Cycling Association of Yukon and Tourism Yukon.

Parks and Park Funding in Los Angeles: An Equity-Mapping Analysis

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Benefits studied:
Uses studied:
Overview: In Los Angeles, historic land use policies that emphasized low-density housing and did not prioritize public park spaces have led to significant inequities of park access across race, ethnicity, and income. A fund designed to improve access to public parks could exacerbate this problem unless it considers proposals for nontraditional public spaces such as schoolyards and vacant lots, because there is very little available park space in the most underserved neighborhoods.
Region:
States:
Place: City of Los Angeles
Citation: Wolch, J., Wilson, J.P. and Fehrenbach, J., 2005. Parks and park funding in Los Angeles: An equity-mapping analysis. Urban Geography 26(1): 4-35.

Snowmobiling in Minnesota: Economic Impact and Consumer Profile

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Benefits studied:
Uses studied:
Overview: This study found that while Minnesota snowmobilers spend a large and growing amount of money each year (nearly $200 million in 2004). However, less than half of that spending occurs at destination sites. Efforts to shift spending on expenses such as equipment and fuel could increase snowmobiling’s economic impact, particularly in rural destinations in northern parts of the state.
Region:
States:
Place: Statewide
Citation: Schneider, I., P. Elisabeth, R. Salk, and T. Schoenecker. 2005. Snowmobiling in Minnesota: Economic Impact and Consumer Profile. University of Minnesota Tourism Center.

The Impact of Greenways on Property Values: Evidence from Austin, Texas; An Assessment of Tax Revenues Generated by Homes Proximate to a Greenway

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Benefits studied:
Uses studied: ,
Overview: The study found that neighborhoods with access to and views of the trail command higher property values, and that these higher property values generate additional tax revenue for municipal and county governments. Trails may not pay for themselves based solely on higher property tax revenue, but the likely additional revenue would offset some of the expense.
Region:
States:
Place: Austin
Citation: Crompton, J., and S. Nicholls. 2006. “An Assessment of Tax Revenues Generated by Homes Proximate to a Greenway.” Journal of Park and Recreation Administration 24(3): 103-108. Nicholls, S., and J. Crompton. 2005. “The Impact of Greenways on Property Values: Evidence from Austin, Texas.” Journal of Leisure Research 37(3): 321-341.