Trails Benefits Library

This Trails Benefits Library is a collection of studies on the positive impacts of trails on businesses, public health, and quality of life. Use this form to search by type of benefit, use, year, and region.

Find trails studies by:

Benefit

Use

Year

Region

Studies found (3) for 2001:

Bicycle Tourism in Maine: Economic Impacts and Marketing Recommendations

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Uses studied:
Overview: This study found that bicycling tourism in Maine is associated with modest spending, largely because nearly all bicycle tourists in the state are day users. Developing long-distance rail-trails and multi-day self-guided tour routes could help increase the number of cycling tourists and increase the economic impact from cycling, particularly in rural communities.
Region:
States:
Place: Statewide
Citation: Wilbur Smith Associates. 2001. Bicycle Tourism in Maine: Economic Impacts and Marketing Recommendations. Maine Department of Transportation Office of Passenger Transportation.

Nebraska Rural Trails: Three Studies of Trail Impact

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Benefits studied:
Overview: This study found that even in very rural places, developed trails provide valuable recreation opportunities for residents in addition to attracting new visitors and spending by non-locals. The results also suggest that trails contributed to increased community pride and a modest increase in activity levels, with few problems from crime or vandalism related to the trails.
Region:
Place: Council Bluffs (IA), Blanchard (MO), Lincoln (NE), Wabash (NE)
Citation: Greer, D.L. 2001. Nebraska Rural Trails: Three Studies of Trail Impact. School of Health, Physical Education and Recreation, University of Nebraska at Omaha.

Summary Report Indiana Trails Study: A Study of Trails in 6 Indiana Cities

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Uses studied: ,
Overview: This study found that trails in six Indiana cities are very popular with residents, especially those who live closest to the trail, and including residents in volunteer patrols and maintenance can improve the trail experience for others and solidify residents’ support for the trails. The benefits of these trails can be expanded if cities are able to increase use by commuters and visitors.
Region:
States:
Place: Fort Wayne, Goshen, Greenfield, Indianapolis, Muncie, Portage
Citation: Wolter, S. and G. Lindsey. 2001. Summary Report Indiana Trails Study: A Study of Trails in 6 Indiana Cities. Eppley Institute for Parks & Public Lands, Indiana University. 2001.