Trails Benefits Library

This Trails Benefits Library is a collection of studies on the positive impacts of trails on businesses, public health, and quality of life. Use this form to search by type of benefit, use, year, and region.

Find trails studies by:

Benefit

Use

Year

Region

Studies found (4) for 2000:

Bicycling and Walking in Colorado: Economic Impact and Household Survey Results

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Uses studied: ,
Overview: This study found that bicycle tourism draws summertime tourists to Colorado ski areas who would not have come otherwise, many of whom come from out-of-state and generate valuable economic impact. Statewide, residents are most concerned about the safety of cycling and strongly support spending on improvements such as new paved off-street bike paths and linking paths to create a statewide system.
Region:
States:
Place: Statewide
Citation: Argys, L., H. Mocan, J. Barela, T. Boonsaeng, M. Darling, J. Garner, P. Niemann, and T. Potter. 2000. Bicycling and Walking in Colorado: Economic Impact and Household Survey Results. Center for Research on Economic and Social Policy of the University of Colorado at Denver.

Estimating the Recreation Demand and Economic Value of Mountain Biking in Moab, Utah: An Application of Count Data Models

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Benefits studied: ,
Uses studied:
Overview: This study found that mountain bikers visiting the Moab, Utah trail system spent an average of $282 per trip and visited 2.5 times per year. Rather than a specific trail, as was studied in the Fix and Loomis (1997) Slickrock Trail study, this study evaluated the benefits of the Moab area’s whole mountain bike trail system.
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States:
Place: Moab
Citation: Chakraborty, K., and J. Keith. 2000. “Estimating the recreation demand and economic value of mountain biking in Moab, Utah: an application of count data models.” Journal of Environmental Planning and Management 43(4): 461-469.

Omaha Recreational Trails: Their Effect on Property Values and Public Safety

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Benefits studied:
Uses studied: ,
Overview: This study found that, according to the residents closest to the trails, the Omaha trail system has had an overwhelmingly positive effect on neighborhoods’ quality of life. The positive effects are not constant across all trails and neighborhoods, though, and neighborhoods that saw the greatest benefit were constructed concurrently with the trails.
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Place: Omaha
Citation: Greer, D. 2000. Omaha Recreational Trails: Their Effect on Property Values and Public Safety. University of Nebraska at Omaha, School of Health, Physical Education and Recreation.

Promoting Physical Activity in Rural Communities: Walking Trail Access, Use, and Effects

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Benefits studied:
Uses studied:
Overview: This study found that walking trails in rural, southeastern Missouri communities are associated with the greatest increase in exercise for those most at risk of inactivity, particularly those who were not already regular walkers, have a high school education or less, or who earn less than $15,000 per year. Trails that were at least a half mile long, paved, or located in the smallest towns were associated with the largest increases in exercise.
Region:
States:
Place: Southeastern Missouri
Citation: Brownson, R., R. Housemann, D. Brown, J. Jackson-Thompson, A. King, B. Malone, and J. Sallis. 2000. “Promoting Physical Activity in Rural Communities: Walking Trail Access, Use, and Effects.” American Journal of Preventive Medicine 18(3): 235-242.