An Economic Impact Study of Bicycling in Arizona

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Benefits studied:
Uses studied: ,
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Place: Statewide

Overview

This study found that Arizona drew 14,000 out-of-state visitors to 250 cycling events in 2012. Because most participants stay for an average of only four days, their visits have a relatively small economic impact in the state-wide economy. However, these events are likely significant to small towns (see 69) and local spending associated with Arizona residents traveling within the state may generate significant additional economic impact (see a similar study in Oregon 68).

Relevance

This study is an example of a state-wide impact analysis, and evaluates the ways cycling can affect the economy. Because the analysis relied on data for cycling-related industries that also include non-cycling-related businesses within the broader industry category, the results may overstate the economic impact of cycling businesses.

Location

This is a statewide study in Arizona.

Trail Type

This study does not evaluate the impact of a specific trail, but instead the general impacts of all types of cycling across the state.

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to document the extent of cycling-related economic impact from visitors and out-of-state customers for cycling-related products made or sold in Arizona. The goal of this information is to help the Arizona Department of Transportation, which commissioned the study, to increase support for cycling-oriented infrastructure.

Findings

  • Cycling events drew roughly 14,000 out-of-state participants to 250 events in 2012. On average, they spent $260 per day and stayed four days in Arizona. Daily spending ranged widely, from $189 in the Phoenix area to $352 in the Tucson area.
  • Road cycling, cyclocross, and touring events are associated with $6.3 million in economic impact, $2.7 million in labor earnings and 101 jobs.
  • Mountain bike events are associated with $2.4 million in economic impact, $1.0 million in labor earnings, and 40 jobs.
  • Triathlon events are associated with $5.7 million in economic impact, $2.4 million in labor earnings, and 83 jobs.
  • BMX events, camps and commercial tours are associated with $2.0 million in economic impact, $1.0 million in labor earnings, and 30 jobs.
  • Bicycling-related wholesaling and retail sales and manufacturing accounted for $57.6 million in economic impact, $17.9 million in labor earnings, and 317 jobs.
  • Cycling events drew roughly 14,000 out-of-state participants to 250 events in 2012. On average, they spent $260 per day and stayed four days in Arizona. Daily spending ranged widely, from $189 in the Phoenix area to $352 in the Tucson area.
  • Road cycling, cyclocross, and touring events are associated with $6.3 million in economic impact, $2.7 million in labor earnings and 101 jobs.
  • Mountain bike events are associated with $2.4 million in economic impact, $1.0 million in labor earnings, and 40 jobs.
  • Triathlon events are associated with $5.7 million in economic impact, $2.4 million in labor earnings, and 83 jobs.
  • BMX events, camps and commercial tours are associated with $2.0 million in economic impact, $1.0 million in labor earnings, and 30 jobs.
  • Bicycling-related wholesaling and retail sales and manufacturing accounted for $57.6 million in economic impact, $17.9 million in labor earnings, and 317 jobs.

Methods

The authors estimate economic impacts by combining two data sources. The first comes from publicly-available data on the number of establishments, number of employees per establishment, wages, sales, and proportion of sales to non-residents for bicycle-related industries (e.g., sports clothing, tour operators, fitness and recreational sports centers).

The second source comes from non-resident spending associated with organized rides, races, and tours. These data were obtained from a combination of mail and online surveys. The authors targeted dealers, manufacturers, event organizers and participants, and tour operators.

These two data sources were used as input into a regional economic model called Redyn.

All analyses were done for five regions and the state overall.

Citation

McClure Consulting, Economic & Policy Resources, Inc., and Kimley-Horn and Associates, Inc. 2013. An Economic Impact Study of Bicycling in Arizona. Prepared for the Arizona Department of Transportation.