Trails Benefits Library

This Trails Benefits Library is a collection of studies on the positive impacts of trails on businesses, public health, and quality of life. Use this form to search by type of benefit, use, year, and region.

Find trails studies by:

Benefit

Use

Year

Region

Studies found (2) for Arkansas:

Economic and Health Benefits of Bicycling in Northwest Arkansas

→Summary & Interpretation

Uses studied: ,
Overview: In northwest Arkansas, a substantial investment in paved and unpaved trails has contributed substantially to the region’s well-being (measured in improved health) and economic performance (measured in visitor spending and employee retention). Evidenced by residents’ interest in living close to trails and willingness to pay more for homes near trails, cycling is an essential part of life in this region.
Region:
States:
Place:

Communities of Bentonville, Fayetteville, Rogers, and Springdale

Citation:

BBC Research and Consulting. 2018. Economic and Health Benefits of Bicycling in Northwest Arkansas. Prepared for The Walton Family Foundation and PeopleForBikes. Denver, CO: BBC Research and Consulting.

A Community-Based Approach to Promoting Walking in Rural Areas

→Summary & Interpretation

Year:
Benefits studied:
Uses studied:
Overview: This study found that in southeastern Missouri, public health interventions to increase residents’ trail use, such as newsletters and fun walks, had no statistically-observable effect on residents’ walking habits or physical activity. A third of those who use the trail report increased overall physical activity levels since they began using the trail, suggesting while that trails can increase community physical activity, a primary challenge is getting residents to begin using them.
Region: ,
Place: Multi-State
Citation: Brownson, R., E. Baker, R. Boyd, N. Caito, K. Duggan, R. Housemann, M. Kreuter, T. Mitchell, F. Motton, C. Pulley, T. Schmid, and D. Walton. 2004. “A community-based approach to promoting walking in rural areas.” American Journal of Preventive Medicine 27(1): 28-34.